Home | News | World News | Take the personality test that could reveal if you have the X Factor

Take the personality test that could reveal if you have the X Factor

By Ellie Zolfagharifard For Dailymail.com

Published: 13:45 EST, 13 October 2015 | Updated: 17:16 EST, 13 October 2015

36

View
comments

One Direction and the Beatles have more in common than you might think.

Researchers have discovered that the personality trait of 'openness' can predict whether you have musical ability and sophistication.

People who score high on openness are imaginative, have a wide range of interests, and are open to new ways of thinking and changes in their environment. 

Take the quiz below to find out your personality type and musical ability, or click here

Scientists suggest this is because 'openness' is something known as a plasticity trait, which allows people to pick up new skills faster.

Goldsmith University, who worked with Cambridge University on the study, has created an interactive quiz to determine what personality trait you have.

Dr Jason Rentfrow, the senior author on the study says: 'It's turning out that personality has far more of a pervasive role in our everyday musical experiences, including our musical ability.'

The study, which appeared in the Journal of Research in Personality, contradicts the old adage that the amount you practice is the key to success.

This idea received widespread attention earlier this decade when writer Malcolm Gladwell argued that it takes 10,000 hours to become an expert in any field.

One Direction (pictured) and the Beatles have more in common than you might think. Researchers have discovered that the personality trait of 'openness' can predict whether you have musical ability

One Direction (pictured) and the Beatles have more in common than you might think. Researchers have discovered that the personality trait of 'openness' can predict whether you have musical ability

But scientists are now discovering that there may be other factors involved as well.

The researchers teamed with the BBC to recruit over 7,000 volunteers, in what is the largest study to date on personality and musical expertise.

The team, led by doctoral researcher David Greenberg, tested the participants on various musical abilities including melodic memory and rhythm perception.

Performance on these tests was then linked to their scores on the Big Five personality traits: Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism (OCEAN).

They found that aside from musical experience, the next best predictor of musical ability was personality, and specifically, 'Openness'.

While people who are high on Openness are open to new ways of thinking, people who score low on Openness, or who are 'Closed', are more set in their ways, prefer routine and the familiar, and tend to have more conventional values.

WHAT DOES YOUR MUSIC TASTE SAY ABOUT YOU? 

Whether you like Taylor Swift  or the Sex Pistols (pictured) could reveal if you're an empathiser

Whether you like Taylor Swift  or the Sex Pistols (pictured) could reveal if you're an empathiser

Do you like your pop to be Taylor Swift or Nicki Minaj?

The answer could give an insight into the way you think, according to separate research by the same team at Cambridge University. 

Scientists have discovered that music listeners usually fall into one of two camps; those who are empathisers, and those who are systemisers. 

An 'empathiser' is someone who likes to focus on other people's emotions, while a 'systemiser' likes to analyse rules and patterns in the world.

'Although people's music choices fluctuate over time, we've discovered a person's empathy levels and thinking style predicts what kind of music they like,' said PhD student David Greenberg from Cambridge University.

The study found people who scored high on empathy tended to prefer mellow music, from R&B, soft rock, and adult contemporary genres,

They also preferred what Cambridge University describes as 'unpretentious music' from country, folk, and singer/songwriter genres, as well as more contemporary music, such as Euro pop.

They disliked intense music, such as punk and heavy metal. In contrast, people who scored high on systemising favoured intense music, but disliked mellow and unpretentious musical styles.

The results proved consistent even within specified genres: empathizers preferred mellow, unpretentious jazz, while systemizers preferred intense, complex and avant-garde jazz.

For example, someone high on Openness will likely take a holiday to a new destination each year, whereas someone low on Openness is likely to revisit the same location year after year.

In addition to Openness, the researchers also found that Extraversion was linked to higher self-reported singing abilities.

Dr Daniel Müllensiefen, a team member from Goldsmiths, University of London who developed the music-performance tests, said: 'Scientists are only now beginning to focus on the nature of musicality in non-musicians.

'The idea that there are people out there who may be primed to be musical, but who have never played an instrument, is a topic that the educational and political spheres should begin to take into consideration.'

Importantly, the researchers found that the links between personality and performance on the musical tasks were present even for people who indicated that they did not play a musical instrument.

TV talent shows such as the X factor are designed to find musical talent. Now, researchers say personality may be a good predictor of this. Pictured on the left is Cheryl Cole, a judge on the show and contestant, Mason Noise on the right
TV talent shows such as the X factor are designed to find musical talent. Now, researchers say personality may be a good predictor of this. Pictured on the left is Cheryl Cole, a judge on the show and contestant, Mason Noise on the right

TV talent shows such as the X factor are designed to find musical talent. Now, researchers say personality may be a good predictor of this. Pictured on the left is Cheryl Cole, a judge on the show and contestant, Mason Noise on the right

This means that there are individuals who have a potential for musical talent, but are entirely unaware of it.

The article is another in a series studies on the how musical behaviours are linked to our personal characteristics.

This past July, David Greenberg and his team published an article in Plos One showing that people's musical preferences are linked to thinking styles.

What these series of studies are telling us is that there are factors beyond our awareness and control that influence our musical experience.

David Greenberg said: 'One day science may be able to identify the personality, cognitive, and neurobiological factors that lead to musical genius.'

Professor Michael Lamb, a co-author, added: 'There may be other factors in addition to personality that affect the development of musical ability.

'For example, what role does parenting play in fostering musicality in their children? Do certain parenting styles encourage musicality more than others?

'Such questions need to be investigated in future research.'

People who score high on openness are imaginative, have a wide range of interests, and are open to new ways of thinking and changes in their environment. Researchers suggest they may have natural musical talent. Picured are the Beatles in 1965

People who score high on openness are imaginative, have a wide range of interests, and are open to new ways of thinking and changes in their environment. Researchers suggest they may have natural musical talent. Picured are the Beatles in 1965

Read more:

MOST WATCHED NEWS VIDEOS

MOST READ NEWS

Most Watched Videos

Most Read News

Best Of The Web

 Join The Ghana Social Network

More from World News

ENTERTAINMENT

Recent Comments

Most Popular Posts

USA News

UK News

News - Articles
Ghana Articles News
Go Up!