Home | News | World News | Acropolis tourism fees soar to pay for Greek debt as attractiction prices rise

Acropolis tourism fees soar to pay for Greek debt as attractiction prices rise

  • Greece is hiking entrance prices at some of its top tourist attractions
  • The government is doing so to help with the nation’s spiralling debts
  • Ticket prices of the Acropolis of Athens will be increased from £9 to £38
  • Entrance to Tower of London is £24.50 and a trip up the Eiffel Tower is £12

By Alisha Rouse For The Daily Mail

Published: 21:22 EST, 14 October 2015 | Updated: 22:21 EST, 14 October 2015

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Cash-strapped Greece is hiking entrance prices at some of its top tourist attractions - reportedly by as much as fourfold - to help with the nation’s spiralling debts.

The debt-riddled country is raising the ticket prices of the Acropolis of Athens, one of its most popular ancient sites dating from the 5th century BC, from £9 to a reported £38.

The country’s left-wing government has called its original prices ‘unacceptably low’, when more than 10,000 tourists visit at the Acropolis a day in the peak season.

Ticket hike: Greece is raising the ticket prices of the Acropolis of Athens (pictured), one of its most popular ancient sites dating from the 5th century BC, from £9 to a reported £38 to help with the nation’s spiralling debts

Ticket hike: Greece is raising the ticket prices of the Acropolis of Athens (pictured), one of its most popular ancient sites dating from the 5th century BC, from £9 to a reported £38 to help with the nation’s spiralling debts

Meanwhile, entrance to the Tower of London is £24.50 and a trip up the Eiffel Tower is £12.

Greece is also expected to double entry charges for other ancient sites - which attract 26 million visitors every year.

Greek travel agents fear the drastically soaring prices could scare away visitors and result in tourism hitting a new low in the troubled country.

Lysandros Tsilidis, the president of the federation of Greek travel agents, told the Guardian: ‘The value-added tax hikes on all goods and tourism services, as well as the announced increases to the ticket prices of museums and archaeological sites, burden the travel package so much that it will become uncompetitive in the end.’

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras (pictured) has argued additional revenues from tourists could offset austerity measures
But Greek travel agents, led by president Lysandros Tsilidis (pictured) fear it could scare away visitors

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras (left) has argued additional revenues from tourists could offset austerity measures. But Greek travel agents, led by president Lysandros Tsilidis (right) fear it could scare away visitors

HOW ADMISSION PRICES VARY AT TOURIST ATTRACTIONS WORLDWIDE

The Eiffel Tower, Paris

The Eiffel Tower, Paris

Acropolis, Athens: £38.55

Burj Khalifa, Dubai: £22

Empire State Building, New York: £20.82 

The London Eye: £19.35

Statue of Liberty, New York: £18.21

Great Pyramid of Giza: £16.50

Petronas Towers, Kuala Lumpur: £13.36 

Eiffel Tower, Paris: £12.62

Leaning Tower of Pisa: £11.12  

L'Arc de Triomphe, Paris: £6.68

The radical Syriza party, led by Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, has argued additional revenues from tourists could offset austerity measures demanded by international bailout creditors, such as higher taxation on all private education.

In a recent interview, culture minister Aristides Baltas said: 'By introducing the price adjustment at state museums and archaeological site entrance fees, we can repeal and replace that measure that affects many more Greeks.' 

The country’s culture ministry confirmed higher prices will also come in at 200 state museums, but unemployed Greeks will be granted free entry.

Officials said other popular tourist sites, such as Ancient Olympia, the birthplace of the Olympic Games, and Europe's oldest city, the Minoan ruins of Knossos on the island of Crete, will more than double their entrance fees.

The new prices would apply between April and November 2016, with a 50 per cent discount for the rest of the year.

In August, the government accepted a third financial bail-out package worth £61bn over three years.

Meanwhile they are facing paying back around £250bn in loans.

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