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Video shows saltwater crocodile devour one of its own in Australia's Darwin

  • The saltwater croc has the severed head of a freshwater croc in its jaws 
  • Fishermen were traversing down a river in northern Australia's Darwin 
  • They caught the cannibalistic spectacle on camera for a fishing program
  • Cannibalism among crocs is a means of controlling their population 

By Nelson Groom for Daily Mail Australia

Published: 03:47 EST, 15 October 2015 | Updated: 04:16 EST, 15 October 2015

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This is the gruesome moment a cannibal saltwater crocodile turned on one of its own and feasted on its smaller freshwater counterpart.

The larger croc can be seen lurking near the shore of a river in northern Australia's Darwin with the severed head of its ill-fated prey hanging out of its jaws.

The unsettling act, which is captured by a group of fishermen, is growing more prevalent as crocodile populations in Australia prosper.

Scroll down for video 

A saltwater crocodile makes a meal out of a smaller juvenile saltwater snapper on a river in Darwin

A saltwater crocodile makes a meal out of a smaller juvenile saltwater snapper on a river in Darwin

‘What’s he got? That’s a shark isn’t it?’ one of the fisherman say as they approach the predatory scenes.

‘It’s a croc. There’s a croc beside him without a head on it’ another fisherman replies.

The vision of the mutilated reptile was filmed for the program Fish'n With Mates, which is hosted by esteemed fishing journalist Al McGlashan.

Chief scientist at Crocodylus Park in Darwin Charlie Manolis told Daily Mail Australia that crocodile cannibalism is on the rise.

‘Saltwater crocodiles populations are rising back to pristine levels, so the bigger crocs are managing the numbers by taking matters into their own hands.’

The reptiles resort to eating their oen for a number of reasons, from smaller crocs annoying larger ones to the the reptiles carrying out their territorial instincts.

The unsettling footage of the mutilated reptile was filmed for a fishing program 

The unsettling footage of the mutilated reptile was filmed for a fishing program 

A two-metre long croc feasts on a smaller specimen on the Daintree River in Queensland, Australia

A two-metre long croc feasts on a smaller specimen on the Daintree River in Queensland, Australia

Another croc-on-croc feast on the Daintree River: experts say cannibalistic feeding is on the rise among most crocodile populations 

‘Crocs are opportunistic eaters, so if you’re unlucky enough to swim one at the wrong time, you risk paying the ultimate price.’

Dr Manolis said that while there are areas that the reptiles were more tolerant of one another, the cannibalistic feeding was on the rise in many environments.  

Fish’n with Mates airs on Channel 7Mate on Sundays at 4.30pm 

 

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